How to Stay Productive at Work While Fighting a Migraine Attack

Take your medicine as soon as you feel the attack coming.

If you start to feel the symptoms of a migraine attack coming on, such as nausea and headache, take your medicine as soon as possible. Taking it early can help reduce pain and other symptoms. Also, taking medication early may help you avoid having to take it during work hours since migraines typically last longer than four hours.

Do not ignore the signs of an impending migraine.

If you suspect that migraine is coming, take the necessary steps to prepare yourself. If you happen to be at work, and your boss has asked you to stay late, try and find a quiet place in which you can relax. This will help prevent an attack from developing further and perhaps be able to head it off before it begins.

If possible, stay away from bright lights or places that have lots of distractions around them—they may cause pain for those who suffer from migraines on a regular basis. You may also want to bring some medicine with you just in case things get worse than expected; this will help ensure that everything goes smoothly without upsetting those around them or causing any unwanted problems for themselves!

Cut down on your workload by delegating projects and tasks to others.

If your migraine attack leaves you unable to complete all of your tasks, ask others for help. Let them know what you can do and what you can’t, and they may be happy to assist. The same goes if they have any questions about a project that’s due tomorrow—they may want to learn more about it so they can get up to speed faster.

You should also consult the internet! You might find that other people with migraines have had similar experiences, which will give you some perspective on how others dealt with their own symptoms. There are also many support groups online where people share advice or provide emotional support during difficult times like this one.

Finally (and most importantly), try not to rely too heavily on medication for relief from these attacks: overuse of medication could lead to dependence on painkillers without any improvement in overall health conditions; furthermore, many medications are addictive and have side effects such as dizziness when taken over long periods of time (source). It’s always best practice not just because the side effects aren’t worth sacrificing but because there are safer ways we can deal with pain such as meditation techniques instead!

Reschedule any important meetings or calls that you need to host or attend.

The first thing to do is to reschedule any important meetings or calls that you need to host or attend. If this is not possible, try delegating the meeting to someone else who can take over for you. If neither of these options are available, consider getting a colleague to cover for you in person (or on a conference call) in case your boss has questions about why you were absent from work today.

Ask someone to cover for you if the meeting or call cannot be rescheduled.

If it’s not possible to reschedule, ask someone to cover for you. Explain what’s going on and ask if they can help out in any way. If they cannot, ask them if they would be willing to recommend someone else who could. Be specific about what your needs are during the meeting or call so that this person can make sure that everything goes smoothly. Thank them after the fact for their assistance!

Take a break from work and step outside the office if possible.

Take a break from work and step outside the office if possible. Getting some fresh air and sunshine is one of the best ways to fight headaches, but only do so if you’re able to stand upright and walk without getting dizzy or feeling nauseous. If you must stay inside, try opening up your office window for some natural light. Don’t take a nap during this time—it’ll just make your headache worse when you wake up!

If taking time off isn’t an option, at least try not to sit in front of a computer screen for too long at once; this can cause eye strain that worsens migraines.

Work near a window with natural light until your migraine subsides.

In some cases, a migraine can be averted by reducing exposure to bright lights or avoiding them altogether. Bright light can trigger the pain of a migraine attack and make it worse. If you are at home, open up your blinds and curtains so that you can get as much natural light as possible. If you have a window in your office, ask your boss if there’s any way for you to work near it until your migraine subsides.

Wear sunglasses if the light hurts your eyes too much.

Wear sunglasses if the light hurts your eyes too much. If you have a migraine attack, it’s likely that you will experience sensitivity to light. Be sure to wear sunglasses that block out as much light as possible.

You can use these other tips in combination with wearing sunglasses:

  • Use a computer screen filter or glare guard over your monitor
  • Turn down overhead lights in the office or use curtains to block them out
  • Close windows and block off fluorescent lights

Keep a bucket handy in case nausea strikes while you’re working.

If you have a bucket handy, use it. If not, there’s always the trash can. Whatever you do, don’t throw up on your desk or computer! Keep a towel nearby to wipe up any mess that may happen.

Ask someone else to keep an eye on your workload while you’re out of the office recovering from a migraine attack.

Asking someone else to keep an eye on your workload while you’re out of the office recovering from a migraine attack can be a great way to ensure that you don’t fall behind. Who do you think might be willing to help? Is there anyone who has shown an interest in taking on more responsibility? How much time would they need to devote to this role? Would it be best for them to work with other colleagues in order to get a better sense of what’s going on with the team as a whole or would it be better for them simply take over from your point of view, handling things however they see fit?

How will we communicate?

In order to make sure that everyone is kept up-to-date about your absence and how long it will last, we suggest setting up some kind of alert system—either through email or text message—that all parties can access at any time. This way if someone needs clarification about something on their own agenda (and therefore yours), they’ll know exactly where and how far along in the process that item should be when they look back at earlier correspondence between yourself and whoever’s covering your workload while away from work recovering from migraines.”

It is possible to keep working even when you have a migraine by taking certain precautions.

It is possible to keep working even when you have a migraine by taking certain precautions.

  • Take your medicine as soon as you feel the attack coming.
  • Do not ignore the signs of an impending migraine, no matter how busy it makes you or how important your work is.
  • Cut down on your workload by delegating projects and tasks to others, if needed.
  • Reschedule any important meetings or calls that you need to host or attend, if necessary

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is possible to keep working even when you have a migraine by taking certain precautions. The first step is knowing what triggers migraines and how to avoid these triggers. Next, you should learn the signs of an impending migraine attack so that you can take your medicine as soon as possible before it gets worse. Finally, remember that there are certain tasks which must be delegated or rescheduled during this time period so that they don’t interfere with other important projects at hand during recovery time after an attack has been averted.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.