The Early Signs Of Stroke: What To Watch For, And How To Get Help Immediately

Overview

Stroke is a medical emergency that occurs when blood flow to the brain stops, leading to brain cells quickly dying without oxygen. The risk of having a stroke doubles for every decade after age 55, and it’s more common in men than women. The five most common symptoms of stroke are weakness, numbness or paralysis in the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body), confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech, trouble seeing in one or both eyes, trouble walking and loss of balance or coordination. To help remember these signs, use the acronym “FAST” ― facial drooping, arm weakness/numbness and difficulty speaking can signal time is FAST running out; it’s time to call 9-1-1. However, not all strokes include these signs; they may develop slowly over hours to days as well as mimic other health conditions such as migraines (which is why many people wait too long before seeking help).

A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain stops, leading to brain cells quickly dying without oxygen.

A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain stops, leading to brain cells quickly dying without oxygen. This is a medical emergency and can be fatal if not treated immediately.

Stroke symptoms are often vague and subtle, so it’s important for you and your family members to know what they look like so that you can take action fast if you recognize any of them in yourself or someone else. The American Stroke Association recommends that everyone learn the stroke warning signs (also called FAST), which stands for Face Drooping, Arm Weakness/Numbness, Speech Difficulty/Loss of Speech (slurred speech), Time To Get Help Immediately!

Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in the U.S., killing about 140,000 Americans each year.

Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in the US, killing about 140,000 Americans each year. It’s also one of the leading causes of disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Strokes can happen to anyone at any age and are caused by a blockage or rupture that stops blood flow within your brain. This deprives a part of your brain from receiving oxygen and nutrients it needs. When this happens over time, it can lead to permanent damage or death.

If you think someone might be having a stroke: Call 9-1-1 immediately!

The risk of having a stroke doubles for every decade after age 55, and it’s more common in men than women.

Strokes are the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States. They’re also one of the leading causes of disability. The risk of having a stroke doubles for every decade after age 55, and it’s more common in men than women.

The risk increases with age, as well as with family history of stroke or high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and diabetes.

The five most common symptoms of stroke are weakness, numbness or paralysis in the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body), confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech, trouble seeing in one or both eyes, trouble walking and loss of balance or coordination.

The five most common symptoms of stroke are weakness, numbness or paralysis in the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body), confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech, trouble seeing in one or both eyes, trouble walking and loss of balance or coordination.

There are additional signs that may point to a stroke:

  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause
  • Sudden blurry vision in one eye
  • Dizziness that cannot be attributed to low blood sugar levels (low blood sugar can make you weak)

To help remember these signs, use the acronym “FAST” ― facial drooping, arm weakness/numbness and difficulty speaking can signal time is FAST running out; it’s time to call 9-1-1.

F-A-S-T can help you remember the signs of stroke:

  • Facial drooping
  • Arm weakness/numbness
  • Speech difficulty (especially if you’re having trouble speaking, slurring your words or understanding what others are saying)

Here is a quick guide to help you recognize stroke and know when it’s time to call 9-1-1.

The symptoms of stroke typically develop rapidly and reach their peak within minutes ― but they may also develop gradually over hours to days and even mimic other health conditions.

Stroke symptoms can be subtle, which makes it important to know what to look for and how to get help immediately. Symptoms vary depending on the type of stroke you have, but they usually develop rapidly and reach their peak within minutes ― but they may also develop gradually over hours to days and even mimic other health conditions.

The symptoms of stroke typically develop rapidly and reach their peak within minutes ― but they may also develop gradually over hours to days and even mimic other health conditions.

Takeaway

If you think someone may be having a stroke, call 9-1-1 immediately and get them to the hospital as soon as possible. The quicker treatment begins, the greater chance of survival and recovery. A stroke can have lasting effects on the brain, so it’s crucial to treat this condition quickly in order to prevent permanent damage or death.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.